Thursday, October 25, 2012

World's Fastest Animal: Sarah the Cheetah's World Record filmed by National Geographic




Sarah the Cheetah: 100 meters in 6.13 seconds
Usain Bolt: 100 meters in 9.58 seconds

Sarah The Cheetah: The Official Fastest Animal On Land

Sarah, a cheetah from the Cincinnati Zoo has shattered the world record for the 100-meter dash...clocking-in a time of 5.95 seconds...making Olympian Usain Bolt's world record of 9.58 seconds look rather...human-esque. 

The 11-yr-old cheetah was radar-timed at up to 61 miles per hour. Cathryn Hilker –founder of the Cincinnati Zoo's Cat Ambassador Program, who raised Sarah since she was a cub stated, "Nobody can run like Sarah," Hilker said. "She's special. I always knew she could run under six seconds, but to see it happen like this is wonderful."

National Geographic photo editor Kim Hubbard also added, "She looked like a polka-dotted missile...I've never seen anything alive run that fast."



Covering 100 metres in 6.13 seconds, Sarah the cheetah set a new speed record for all land mammals on the 9th September 2008 in Cincinnati, America. Running on a specially designed 100-metre course at Cincinnati Zoo's Regional Cheetah Breeding Facility at Mast Farm, Sarah eclipsed the previous record time of 6.19 seconds. Sarah, who is now officially the world's fastest land animal, was so quick that she actually caught up with the lure that was encouraging her to hit such high speeds.


Cheetahs may be even considerably faster in the wild when faced w/ adverse survival situations such as running from a predator or chasing a prey (meal) for their starving cubs; which may cause it to run considerably faster.


Lamborghini Gallardo Cheetah Matte Edition

With acceleration rivaling a Lamborghini, cheetahs have been known to accelerate from 0-to-60 mph in 3 seconds! Cheetahs are –-by far, the fastest living animal on land — reaching top speeds between 70 and 75 mph.


Cheetah Lambo

Unfortunately, cheetahs are an endangered species w/ an estimated population of only 9,000-to-12,000 remaining worldwide. The documentation of the run was sponsored by National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative to preserve big cats in the wild through conservation, economic incentives and spreading public awareness.

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